Teddy’s Romper Pattern Review

I’m still sewing!  I was expecting to have moved on to another topic by now, but I’m having so much fun.  These little rompers from Puperita are another great way to use up fabric (especially for the binding) and keep yourself busy.  I made two in as many days and I could make more, but I’m trying to Julie and Julia my way through my patterns.  I really like the end results of the pattern and I’m sure I’ll be buying more of her designs.  The patterns are SUPER easy to read as well, makes sewing them a breeze.

What I Did

I think the design as is, is great.  I don’t (STILL!!!) have any good fabric for boys.  This striped fabric was my best option, so I wanted to dress it up a little.  For some reason, I immediately thought Donald Duck when I saw it so that’s what I ran with.  I found an adorable drawing by Melian86 and printed it on a sheet of fabric transfer paper I had.  Sadly, I didn’t have any for dark fabrics, so I had to make sure Donald was on a white background so he’d be seen properly.  Overall, I’m happy with how it turned out, I just wish I didn’t need a pocket to get the detail I wanted.  Next time, I’ll be prepared!

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If you make this pattern and decide to add an iron on, make sure you flip your image before printing.  This is especially important if you have letters as they’ll end up backward if you don’t.  Clip around your image as close to the lines as possible so you don’t have as much of the white background showing.  I hate when I see a transfer and it’s obvious they just cut a square around what they wanted to transfer.  Take a few minutes and cut it out closely, you’ll thank me later. 

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For my pocket, I cut 2 pieces of cotton at 3.5″ x 4.5″.  I sewed all around (leaving a gap at the bottom for turning) using a 1/4″ seam allowance.  Clip your corners and turn right side out.  Gently poke out your corners to get them as crisp as possible, press and add your image.  After your image is on your pocket, place the pocket where you’d like it and topstitch it on.  Sew around 3 sides, backstitching when you start and when you finish.  Leave the top edge open.  Follow the sewing pattern as described.

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I did everything else “by the book” except for a few small things.  My first attempt, I made a girl version.  I gathered the legs as instructed and the fit was snug on my 10-month-old (and I made the 12-month size).  This time around, I opted not to gather the legs and it fit him MUCH better.

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The pattern calls for sew on snaps.  I personally don’t care for sew on snaps so I chose to use the kind you have to hammer on.  Apparently, it thoroughly amuses my kids to see the hammer in my sewing room.  I turn into a side show whenever I have to apply them.  I really do like the finish it adds and I don’t have to sew on any buttons.  I ran out of snaps and settled on using snap tape that I had.  I.hate.this.stuff… Nuff said.  I will never buy it again, or use it!  I’ll stick to lining up my snaps and praying I don’t hammer my fingers.

I don’t really know how to attach the snap tape and didn’t feel like investing a whole lot of time into figuring it out.  For Ethan’s, I figured I’m not super fussy so I didn’t mind if the tape didn’t look fantastic, as long as the romper stayed on.  I’m happy to report that it does!   I simply folded under the raw edges and stitched around the whole piece using my zipper foot.  This was not a smooth process and I wished I hadn’t done it once I started.  Lesson learned.

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From a consumer P.O.V., I’d definitely recommend this pattern.  I would consider sizing up, especially if your little bundle is a fluffy.  When I get around to making this again, I’ll probably line it.  I think if I do, I can add elastic and casing to the legs.  Changes weren’t necessary and I didn’t alter anything other than leaving out the one step and using different closures because that’s what I had on hand.

He seems plenty happy with it!
He seems plenty happy with it!

By the way, I’m on the lookout for some patterns to fit a 12-year-old.  Most of the PDF designers’ stop at a size 8 or 10.  Maya is NOT happy about this!  If you know of any, drop me a message!!  See you Wednesday.

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